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dc.contributor.authorGuembe García, Marta
dc.contributor.authorPeredo Guzmán, Patricia D.
dc.contributor.authorSantaolalla García, Victoria
dc.contributor.authorMoradillo Renuncio, Natalia
dc.contributor.authorIbeas Cortes, Saturnino 
dc.contributor.authorMendía Jalón, Aránzazu 
dc.contributor.authorGarcía García, Félix Clemente 
dc.contributor.authorGarcía Pérez, José Miguel 
dc.contributor.authorVallejos Calzada, Saúl 
dc.date.accessioned2020-06-03T08:52:19Z
dc.date.available2020-06-03T08:52:19Z
dc.date.issued2020-06
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10259/5321
dc.description.abstractWe anchored a colourimetric probe, comprising a complex containing copper (Cu(II)) and a dye, to a polymer matrix obtaining film‐shaped chemosensors with induced selectivity toward glycine. This sensory material is exploited in the selectivity detection of glycine in complex mixtures of amino acids mimicking elastin, collagen and epidermis, and also in following the protease activity in a beefsteak and chronic human wounds. We use the term inducing because the probe in solution is not selective toward any amino acid and we get selectivity toward glycine using the solid‐state. Overall, we found that the chemical behaviour of a chemical probe can be entirely changed by changing its chemical environment. Regarding its behaviour in solution, this change has been achieved by isolating the probe by anchoring the motifs in a polymer matrix, in an amorphous state, avoiding the interaction of one sensory motif with another. Moreover, this selectivity change can be further tuned because of the effectiveness of the transport of targets both by the physical nature of the interface of the polymer matrix/solution, where the target chemicals are dissolved, for instance, and inside the matrix where the recognition takes place. The interest in chronic human wounds is related to the fact that our methods are rapid and inexpensive, and also considering that the protease activity can correlate with the evolution of chronic wounds.es
dc.description.sponsorshipFEDER (Fondo Europeo de Desarrollo Regional), and both the Spanish Ministerio de Economía, Industria y Competitividad (MAT2017‐84501‐R) and the Consejería de Educación—Junta de Castilla y León (BU061U16)es
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoenges
dc.publisherMDPIes
dc.relation.ispartofPolymers. 2020, V. 12, n. 6, 1249es
dc.rightsAtribución 4.0 Internacional*
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/*
dc.subjectsolid‐state chemosensorses
dc.subjectsensory polymerses
dc.subjectamino acidses
dc.subjectchronic woundses
dc.titleWhy is the Sensory Response of Organic Probes within a Polymer Film Different in Solution and in the Solid-State? Evidence and Application to the Detection of Amino Acids in Human Chronic Woundses
dc.typeinfo:eu-repo/semantics/articlees
dc.rights.accessRightsinfo:eu-repo/semantics/openAccesses
dc.relation.publisherversionhttps://doi.org/10.3390/polym12061249es
dc.identifier.doi10.3390/polym12061249
dc.identifier.essn2073-4360
dc.journal.titlePolymerses
dc.volume.number12es
dc.issue.number6es
dc.page.initial1249es
dc.type.hasVersioninfo:eu-repo/semantics/publishedVersiones


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